Vanishing Privacy With Real-Time Facial Recognition

February 5, 2014, by Ken Jorgustin

vanishing-privacy-real-time-facial-recognition
Image credit: nametag.ws

It is very disturbing (to me) the speed at which we are allowing technology to invade and strip our privacy. It seems that nearly every day we read about a new technological mechanism that chips away at our personal identity and right to privacy.

The latest is the ‘NameTag’ smartphone or Google Glass app, which enables a person to simply snap a picture of someone (purportedly who you want to connect with) and see their entire public online presence in one place… Everything about you…


 
Your most unique feature – your face, enables the real-time facial recognition technology to link your face to a single, unified online presence that includes your contact information, social media profiles, interests, and anything else which the app may discover about you based on your electronic footprints of online activities.

When someone passes you on the street (or anywhere), they don’t know who you are – unless they ask or already know. With this new technology they will apparently be able to discover all sorts of things about any stranger by simply pointing their smartphone at them (or apparently when wearing Google Glass or other such technology). So much for asking…

According to eonline.com, the “real-time facial recognition” software “can detect a face using the Google Glass camera, send it wirelessly to a server, compare it to millions of records, and in seconds return a match complete with a name, additional photos and social media profiles.”

The information listed could include your name, occupation, any social media profiles you have set up and whether or not you have a criminal record.

Two million entries have already been uploaded to FacialNetwork.com.

Apparently, once the app officially goes live, the only way to opt-out of this database is to sign up for NameTag telling them not to show your information in the first place.

HOW IS THAT OK?!

Forcing people to opt-out if they want to maintain their privacy is wrong (and probably illegal).

 
Our privacy is vanishing. And we are letting it.

DHS was testing a facial recognition technology last year – I wonder how they’ve advanced since then… Between the blimps, the drones, the license plate scanners, toll road and other RFID scanners, the NSA American surveillance, your smartphone tracking, your vehicle’s GPS being tracked, your phone calls tracked, your emails read, your online activity profiled, your post office envelopes photographed, and now your face being electronically recognized as you travel in front of this technology…

They watch you, they know what you watch, what you read, what you say, where you go, what you do, when you do it, what you buy, how many you buy, the energy you use… I wonder if they know when you take a $hit?

Privacy? What privacy?