Were Door-to-Door Searches Too Much?

April 30, 2013, by Ken Jorgustin

Door to Door Search

The Boston bombers of the terror attack on April 15 that killed 3 and injured 264 were identified by private citizens who shared their photographs with the police.

The 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was discovered by a civilian.

Now that some time has gone by and some of the emotion has subsided, do you believe the police crackdown on the city and door-to-door search was the right thing to do?


 
Boston door to door search

The bombing suspects were not identified by the government or by government surveillance cameras, but by private citizens. However during the days that followed the bombing, thousands of police and personnel from countless government agencies locked down the city of Boston and its suburbs in military style fashion while they hunted down the suspects.

Watching the events unfold on TV was surreal as we watched military raids on homes up and down the streets of suburban Boston as residents were removed from their homes at gunpoint while they searched for the suspects.

While it is completely understandable…the strong desire to find the bomber…many were stunned to witness residents being forcefully removed from their homes, being frisked and apparently treated as combatants, and held outside until the home was thoroughly searched.

For some, the police action was a clear violation of American rights, a precedent-setting government police action, and an additional sign of the times as Americans experience an increasing police state.

For others, the police action was a welcome sight and a relief to see, as they themselves apparently were frightened and felt better knowing that the police were coming into people’s homes to search for the suspect.

Recently, former representative Ron Paul said the law enforcement that swarmed around Boston in the days following the marathon bombings was scarier than the actual terrorist attack.

“The Boston bombing provided the opportunity for the government to turn what should have been a police investigation into a military-style occupation of an American city,”

“This unprecedented move should frighten us as much or more than the attack itself.”

It was like a “military coup in a far off banana republic,”

“Force lockdown of a city. Militarized police riding tanks in the streets. Door-to-door armed searches without warrant. Families thrown out of their homes at gunpoint to be searched without probable cause. Businesses forced to close. Transport shut down.”

– Washington Times

 
New polling numbers suggest that United States citizens are on average more afraid of their own government than the threat of another terrorist attack. Statistics show that distrust against the federal government continues to climb.

A poll conducted by the Washington Post just three days after the Boston Marathon bombing reveals that nearly half of those surveyed say that the government will go too far in trying to prevent future acts of terrorism.

53 percent of Americans polled by the Pew Research Center said the federal government is threatening their personal rights and freedoms.

 
What about you? What do you think? Was the police action justified in this case?

Do you trust your government in situations like this?

If we are to believe what we saw and heard on the TV news following the aftermath of the police lock-down, nearly everyone interviewed was grateful of the police actions that were taken. Does this reflect the opinion of the majority? Or were these interviews hand picked to slant our public perception?