Thanksgiving Today Vs. The Thankful Pilgrims Early Hardships

November 27, 2014, by Ken Jorgustin

the-lesson-of-thanksgiving

The Meaning Of Thanksgiving

The historical meaning of Thanksgiving has become diluted for many Americans today. Our modern generations have never experienced the hardships similar to that of the early Pilgrims while they were learning to successfully grow crops while starving and trying to feed themselves by any means possible.

Their lives consisted of pure core survival. When they finally figured things out (after a failed communal social experiment where the hard-working subsidized the slackers and was scrapped for a more self-responsible approach) and after they finally had successful harvests after a ‘learning curve’, they were humbled and were truly thankful for what they had produced.

Today, for the vast majority in the developed modern world, our food is nicely laid out for us to pick at the grocery store – from all corners of the world. We can go to restaurants and be served. We can drive through at fast-food joints and be eating within seconds. There’s not a second thought about it being there – or where it came from – or how fortunate we are. Since we don’t have to produce it ourselves and we can get it anytime, we do not know the hardships of our ancestors.

If the SHTF…

 
…I have a strong feeling that many more people will get in touch with being truly thankful for what they have.

Don’t take it for granted what we have today. It has been a historic time of unbelievable plenty. And it may not always be that way.

Let’s be extra thankful this Thanksgiving holiday and use it as motivation to double-down our efforts to be better prepared for hard times, in case they do come our way. Let’s learn to grow some of our own food. It took the early Pilgrims many years to figure it out.

 

The First Thanksgiving & Menu

In the year 1621 at Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts, a celebration feast and thanksgiving for a good harvest was prompted by the Pilgrims with the native American Wampanoag tribe.

The practice of holding an annual harvest festival became a regular affair in New England in the late 1660s.

President of the United States, George Washington proclaimed the first nation-wide thanksgiving celebration in America in 1789.

The final Thursday in November became the customary date of Thanksgiving beginning in 1863 by a presidential proclamation of Abraham Lincoln.

Turkey
Waterfowl
Venison
Fish
Lobster
Clams
Berries
Fruit
Pumpkin
Squash

 
Happy Thanksgiving everyone, from Modern Survival Blog.

I can hardly wait for some of Mrs.J’s homemade pumpkin pie…