Memorial Day; Never Forget

May 26, 2014, by Ken Jorgustin

Memorial Day, Never Forget

Today, Memorial Day, originating after the American Civil War, Americans gather at memorials, cemeteries, and at parades nationwide to honor those who died while serving in the United States Armed Forces; casualties of war.

Regardless of one’s own opinion ‘why’ any war is fought, today we remember those individuals who sacrificed their lives fulfilling their duty.

Memorial Day is also the traditional start of the summer season of vacations and barbeque’s with friends and family. This year though, this memorial day holiday while you’re sharing good times with those around you, imagine if one of them was no longer there, and was instead a casualty of war. The reality is that there are countless gatherings around the country where someone is missing – a friend or relative – a casualty of war. Never forget.

 
The following list of U.S. casualties during wartime is a reality check…


 

U.S. Casualties And Wounded During Major Wars

 

War on Terror

2003-present
6,809 total deaths
52,010 wounded

Gulf War

1990-1991
294 deaths
849 wounded

Vietnam War

1955-1975
58,209 deaths
153,303 wounded

Korean War

1950-1953
36,516 deaths
92,134 wounded

World War II

1941-1945
405,399 deaths
670,846 wounded

World War I

1917-1918
204,002 deaths
320,518 wounded

Civil War

1861-1865
625,000 deaths
unknown wounded

Mexican-American War

1846–1848
13,283 deaths
4,152 wounded

War of 1812

1812–1815
15,000 deaths

The number of Americans who died from disease is not known, although it is estimated that about 15,000 died from all causes directly related to the war, and 4,500 wounded.

American Revolutionary War

1775–1783
25,000 deaths

The total loss of life throughout the war is largely unknown.
More than 25,000 American Revolutionaries died — about 8,000 were in battle; the other 17,000 recorded deaths were from starvation or disease brought on by deplorable conditions while prisoners of war, most in rotting British prison ships in New York. The tally of deaths from disease is undoubtedly too low; 2,500 Americans died while encamped at Valley Forge in the winter of 1777–78 alone. The total American military casualty figure may have been as high as 50,000 (from a population at the time of 2.5 million).