Rice and Beans, A Survival Combination

October 4, 2014, by Ken Jorgustin

rice-and-beans-survival-food

Rice is rich in starch, and an excellent source of energy. Beans are rich in protein, and contain other minerals. The consumption of the two together provides all the essential amino acids and it is no wonder that this combination is a staple of many diets throughout the world.

Here’s why they are a good combination for long-term survival food storage, and their calories per pound, survival days, etc…

(UPDATED)


 

WHITE RICE

 
5 gallon bucket of White Rice (30 lbs of rice)
50,000 calories
25 survival days

1655 calories per pound (uncooked)
590 calories per pound (cooked)

675 calories per cup (uncooked)
205 calories per cup (cooked)

Note: For long term food storage, do not use brown rice (use only white rice) because it will go rancid within a year from it’s oils.

 

BEANS

 
5 gallon bucket of Beans (30 lbs of beans)
47,000 calories
24 survival days

1574 calories per pound (uncooked)
650 calories per pound (cooked)

670 calories per cup (uncooked)
245 calories per cup (cooked)

Note: There is a slight variation of calories per pound for different bean varieties. Numbers listed above are an average. They are mostly similar…

Note: After many years, beans loose their ability to soften up while re-hydrating in water, and the cooking process may result al dente. The beans will remain edible and will not have lost their food value – just saying. Maybe you rotate your beans every so many years…

 

 
Having one 5 gallon bucket each of rice and beans will provide nearly 50 days of ‘survival’ calories.

While you will not want to eat rice and beans every day and every meal, the combination is an inexpensive food storage ‘staple’ as part of your overall food storage diversity.

Some food storage outlets will sell you rice and/or beans already packed and sealed for long term food storage in buckets. However you can also do it yourself by purchasing in bulk and then use Mylar bags, oxygen absorbers, and your own 5 gallon buckets. You might also choose to use an ordinary kitchen vacuum sealer and store smaller quantities (which could still be held in 5 gallon buckets for safe keeping).

How To Seal A Mylar Bag In A 5 Gallon Bucket

 

 

Rice, White, Long Grain – Nutrition Per Cup, Cooked

 
Fat (0.44 grams)
Carbohydrates (44 grams)
Fiber (0.6 grams)
Protein (4.25 grams)

Very low in saturated fat
No cholesterol
Very low in sodium
Very low in sugar

 

Beans, Pinto – Nutrition Per Cup, Cooked

 
Fat (1.1 grams)
Carbohydrates (44.8 grams)
Fiber (15.4 grams)
Protein (15.4 grams)

Very low in saturated fat
No cholesterol
Very low in sodium
Very low in sugar
Very high in dietary fiber
Very high in protein

 
By themselves, rice and beans are bland. No doubt there are countless spices and other ingredients you can add to increase nutrition and make them more palatable.

What are your suggestions?