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Everyday Risks Are Directly Proportional To Population Density

March 27, 2017, by Ken Jorgustin

I have known for quite some time that one’s chances of encountering a dangerous situation or “close call” or everyday risks in general are directly proportional to the population density of the region.

I have a unique advantage of being able to tell you that this is 100% accurate…

Here’s why/how:


 
1. Where I have lived and the life experiences that I’ve encountered.
2. My most recent road-trip.

 
Throughout the years of my life I have lived in places of varying suburban densities and I have also lived (currently) in a very rural region. I have worked in very urban cities and have traveled to a wide variety of places with a range of population densities from very dense urban to suburban to rural.

My life experiences from living and working in a variety of population densities have led to the conclusion that generally there are probabilities of dangerous encounters, close encounters, and everyday risks EVERYWHERE.

HOWEVER!, the likelihood and frequency of encountering a dangerous situation, a “close call”, etc.., are pretty much directly proportional to the population density of the region itself.

This may sound very simplistic, however it is very significant.

For someone who has lived their entire life in a region with a given population density may believe that the frequency of “close encounters” or “close calls” that may come their way are “just the way it is”, and that it’s “just life”. What they may not realize is that these “close calls” would likely be drastically reduced from within a less population dense region.

For example, automobile insurance costs LOTS MORE when living in a city than a more rural region. Why? Because the odds of an accident are LOTS higher in the populous city than a rural region. It’s logical.

For example, the odds of encountering an aggressive and/or angry driver while out on the roads are MUCH higher where there are lots of people driving! (makes sense, right?) The thing is, I’m not saying that you won’t encounter this in a less populated region (you will!), however i am saying that the odds of encounter are much less! Again, makes sense, right?

Another example… The odds of encountering situations with someone whom you might say is “an idiot” are MUCH more likely in a population dense region. Why? Because mathematically there are more “idiots” there!

 
I have been on a road-trip for a number of weeks and it sure is apparent of the increased systemic risks as you begin to traverse through a population-dense or city region! Quite evidently the risk factor goes up by magnitudes while the density of population (and drivers on the road) increase.

Every close encounter during this trip so far has been through population dense regions and it has always been something stupid that the other driver did…

There are stupid drivers everywhere, but there are LOTS MORE of them in population dense regions. The same generality applies to other areas as well (not just driving).

Road Atlas 2017: Large Scale

 
Why am I stating the obvious? Because it is a significant truth that many risks go way up when you live and move about in a population dense region. When we talk about serious disaster, SHTF, or collapse, this fact may hinder or even greatly diminish one’s odds of survival.

Regardless of where you live, normalcy bias sets in and one’s experiences with “close calls”, dangerous encounters, or other such risks seem to be “just the way it is”. Just be aware that the frequency and magnitude of all this may greatly increase if and when times get tough…

 
What are your own experiences in this regard (population density vs. risk)?