Impacts Of Jobs Offshoring On The U.S. Economy

November 1, 2013, by Ken Jorgustin

impacts-of-offshoring-jobs

Is it too late? I think it might be too late. When skilled jobs are sent abroad, the skills disappear at home. So do the supply chains and the businesses associated with the skills. Things close down, and abilities are lost. Why take a major in college for a job that is offshored. A culture disappears…


 
But we can start them back up, right? Perhaps not. When a First World country exports its technology and know-how abroad to a Third World country in order to benefit from lower cost labor, how does the First World country get the work back? Living standards and the cost of living in Third World countries are much lower than in First World countries. The populations of First World countries cannot pay their mortgages, car payments, student loans, medical care, and grocery bills with the wages of Third World countries.

When First World wages drop, mortgage, car, credit card, and student loan payments do not drop. Americans cannot live on Chinese, Indian, and Indonesian wages. Once the technology and know-how is transferred, the low wage country has the advantage in the absence of tariff protection.

For America to revive, our economy would have to be walled off with high tariffs, and subsidies would have to be provided in order to recreate US industry and manufacturing. But many corporations now produce offshore, and America is broke. The government has been $1 trillion dollars in the hole each year for the last 5 years.

Jobs offshoring diminished the US tax base. When a job is sent abroad, so is that job’s contribution to US GDP and tax base. When millions of jobs are sent abroad, US GDP and tax base cannot support government spending levels. To the extent that there are any replacement jobs, they are in lowly paid domestic services, such as waitresses, bartenders, retail clerks, and hospital orderlies. These jobs do not provide a tax base or consumer spending power comparable to manufacturing jobs and tradable professional services such as software engineering and information technology.

 
The words above are of Paul Craig Roberts (paulcraigroberts.org), former Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Economic Policy and associate editor of the Wall Street Journal, who succinctly sums up the situation of having sent our jobs offshore.

This is just one of the many reasons to become better prepared for the aftermath of a decaying and collapsing economy, an economy held up by illusions and twisted sets of data while the FED prints new countless $Billions (currently $85B) each month to keep the country afloat. One might argue that it took a notable turn for the worse when the nation began offshoring its manufacturing base. It seems to be too late for that now…

Are you prepared?