Homemade Remedy For Dehydration

Homemade Remedy For Dehydration

Becoming severely dehydrated can rapidly become life threatening.

The most common cause of dehydration is diarrhea, which can be a result of food poisoning, drinking contaminated water, or other sickness or contamination.

Those who have experienced any of these ailments know full well the severity at which your body can be ‘put down’ by an invisible agent.

Especially when in an environment of post-disaster or unsanitary living conditions, you are at risk of being inflicted with diarrhea which can rapidly lead to dehydration.

The key to recovery is to remain hydrated. A homemade re-hydration solution from the following recipe could become a lifesaver for someone who is ill and dehydrated.


 
Because plain water does not contain sugar, sodium, or potassium (which also is lost from diarrhea) it is important to drink plenty of fluids that contain these substances.

Examples of such drinks include ‘sports drinks’, prepared re-hydration solutions, chicken or beef broth, soft drinks, or bottled and flavored mineral water.

Antibiotics will sometimes resolve the symptoms of diarrhea – however, antibiotics won’t help with viral diarrhea, which is the most common type of infectious diarrhea.

Drugs that slow diarrhea are controversial. Some doctors don’t like their patients to take these medications because it slows the passage of the virus, bacteria, or parasite out of the body. If you wonder whether you should use any of the over-the-counter preparations available for diarrhea, ask your doctor.

 
A simple alternative to a store-bought re-hydration solution is the following recipe from the World Health Organization:

 

Homemade Remedy Solution For Dehydration From Diarrhea

Clean water (4.5 cups or 1L)

Salt (1/2 teaspoon or 2.5mL)

Sugar (6 teaspoons or 30mL)

OR…

Clean water (1 cup)

Salt (1/8 teaspoon)

Sugar (1.5 teaspoons)

Oral rehydration solutions should be consumed or discarded within 12 hours if held at room temperature.

 
Sources include the World Health Organization, WebMD

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15 Comments

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  4. This article refers to the loss of sodium, potassium, and sugar and says it is important to drink fluids that contain these substances. So why is potassium chloride not included in the rehydration solution recipe? Nu-Salt is readily available and is just potassium chloride. Does anyone want to suggest a quantity to include in the recipe?

    1. Are you sure that Potassium Chloride is part of Nu-Salt? It’s a prescription medication in the state I live in.

  5. I have been reading this blog for less than a year and have found it to be a wealth of knowledge. Both the articles and tools offered have been very objective. Thanks for the offering a knowledge Ken.

    1. @notalone, Thank you for your comment. Over time I tend to cover a fairly broad array of topics, although mostly under the big umbrella of preparedness.

  6. I know it is strange but the old timers where I live swear by dill pickle juice. Drink 8 oz and relax for about an hour. This wards off the dehydration? I have tried it and it seemed to work. Has anyone else ever heard of this or tried it?

    1. Deporter…I hve read this (re pickle juice) many times over the past few yrs. I love dill pickles, and will have one for an upset stomach, etc., but myself could not “drink” it.

      after reading your post, I googled it, and found many use it to improve running endurance, and much else..

      “What Are the Benefits of Drinking Dill Pickle Juice?
      dill pickle juice might help reduce the muscle cramping
      dill pickle juice, drink about 2.5 ounces of pickle juice after your workout session.
      How it Works
      Pickle juice is slightly acidic. Scientists believe the acidic substance found in pickle juice — vinegar — sends signals to your nerves. This disrupts the cramping caused during workout sessions”
      —————
      “The study, conducted by researchers at Brigham Young University in Utah, supports years of anecdotal evidence that briny substances such as pickles combat muscle cramps better than water by replacing the salt and fluids the body loses through sweat.”
      ————————-
      “Drinking three tablespoons of dill pickle juice is a remedy I follow, both for night cramps in my thighs and for twitchy feet. The dill pickle juice works astonishingly fast, within seconds. I keep a jar next to my bed for use only as needed”
      ———-
      and lots more

      interesting

  7. I make several concoctions for thirst/dehydration. One is sliced cucumber doused with salt in a bowl for several hours into a mason jar and fill with some white vinegar and water and let sit for a day. Eat a slice and it will cause you to drink more water.
    Next is either lemon or lime sliced and the same treatment as above.

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