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Bleach Water Ratio For Disinfecting | Make Your Own Disinfectant

I have updated the bleach water ratio with guidelines from the CDC regarding COVID-19 Coronavirus. I’ve also included ratios for making 1 gallon, 1 quart, or 2 cups (convenient for a spray bottle).

Bleach is one of the most widely available and affordable disinfectants on earth. Clorox® brand liquid bleach was introduced in 1913 and has played a critical role in helping to protect public health by killing germs that cause illness.

(Disinfectant Bleach Water Ratio Listed Below)
– Non food surfaces
– Food contact surfaces

Bleach is commonly mixed with water for use as a disinfectant to kill germs that can make people sick. This includes MRSA, Staph, and Norovirus (among many others!).

Germs and viruses can thrive in the kitchen, bathroom, baby’s room, laundry room, especially around toilets, sinks, faucets and bathtubs.

The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – recommend the use of bleach for controlling the spread of pathogens that can cause infections and other health threats.

Recommended bleach disinfectant ratio mixed with water for non-food surfaces and food contact surfaces:


CAUTION: Do not mix Clorox® Regular-Bleach with other household chemicals. Toxic fumes could result.

Bleach Water Ratio For Disinfectant (Non-Food Surfaces)

(NON-FOOD SURFACES)

2500 ppm chlorine mixture

For cleaning, sanitizing, and disinfecting surfaces such as bathtubs, sinks, faucets, tile, plastic toys, potty chairs, high chairs, changing tables, floors, appliances, countertops, garbage cans, walls, light switches, etc..

Pre-wash surface with detergent and water, then apply the sanitizing solution of bleach and water. Allow solution to contact surface for at least 5 minutes for optimum effectiveness. Afterward, rinse and-or air dry.

(Informational sources listed below)
(numbers are rounded)

This solution will be sourced from Regular Household Bleach that has a 6% Sodium Hypochlorite concentration and we will dilute it with water to make a 2,500 ppm concentration for disinfecting:

Dilution bleach to water ratio of 1:22

3/4 cup Clorox® Regular-Bleach / GALLON water

2-3/4 Tablespoons Clorox® Regular-Bleach / Quart (4 cups) water

4 teaspoons Clorox® Regular-Bleach / Pint (2 cups) water

Bleach Solution For Spray Bottles:

These mixtures are the same concentration as listed above.

  • 4 teaspoons with 16 ounces of water
  • 6 teaspoons with 24 ounces of water
  • 8 teaspoons with 32 ounces of water

32 Ounce Chemical Spray Bottles

Consider the following heavy duty spray bottles for your bleach disinfectant solution:

Heavy Duty Spray Bottles for Chemical solutions

>> HARRIS Pro 32-ounce
(view on amzn)

COVID-19 Coronavirus Disinfection with Bleach | CDC Recommendations

The Centers for Disease Control recommends a bleach water ratio which produces at least 1,000 ppm sodium hypochlorite.

Therefore the formulas listed ^^above (2,500 ppm) are more than adequate.

Minimum bleach water ratio for Coronavirus:

“Diluted household bleach solutions (at least 1,000 ppm sodium hypochlorite) can be used if appropriate for the surface. Follow manufacturer’s instructions for application, ensuring a contact time of at least 1 minute, and allowing proper ventilation during and after application.”

“Check to ensure the product is not past its expiration date. Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser. Unexpired household bleach will be effective against coronaviruses when properly diluted.”

~ CDC

Prepare a bleach solution by mixing:

5 tablespoons (1/3 cup) bleach per gallon of water or

4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water

~ CDC (source document)

Bleach Water Ratio For Disinfectant (Food Contact Surfaces)

(FOOD CONTACT SURFACES)

200 ppm chlorine mixture

For cleaning food handling equipment and food contact surfaces such as plastic cutting boards*, stainless cutlery, dishes, glassware, pots and pans, stainless utensils, pet bowls, teething rings,

Pre-wash surface with detergent and water. Then soak with the sanitizing solution of bleach and water. Allow solution to contact surface for at least 2 minutes for optimum effectiveness. Drain and air dry.

(Informational sources listed below)
(numbers are rounded)

This solution will be sourced from Regular Household Bleach that has a 6% Sodium Hypochlorite concentration and we will dilute it with water to make a 200 ppm concentration for disinfecting:

Dilution bleach to water ratio of 1:285

2-3/4 teaspoons Clorox® Regular-Bleach / GALLON water

3/4 teaspoon Clorox® Regular-Bleach / Quart (4 cups) water

1/3 teaspoon Clorox® Regular-Bleach / Pint (2 cups) water


I have a pair of these for when mixing larger batches of bleach (in a gallon bucket for example). It’s just a good thing to have a pair in general:

HEAVY DUTY PVC CHEMICAL GLOVES (Wells Lamont)
>> Heavy Duty PVC Chemical Gloves
(view on amzn)

NOTE: This is NOT (NOT!) the formula for drinking water purification. Rather it is much stronger for disinfecting surfaces.

For drinking water purification, read the following articles:
[ Read: Make Drinking Water Safe With Bleach ]
[ Read: Bleach – Water Ratio For Drinking Water Purification ]

CAUTION: Do not mix Clorox® Regular-Bleach with other household chemicals. Toxic fumes could result.

TIP: Bleach formula breaks down after awhile. For health care, day care, it is commonly recommended to make new formula in 24 hours.

NOTE: Bleach solutions may discolor fabrics (your clothes, carpets, etc..).

For disinfecting Ebola virus, read: “Ebola Virus Disinfection With Bleach

UPDATE: Clorox has adjusted their concentration blend (sodium hypochlorite) over the years. They’ve gone from 5.25%, 6%, up to 8.25%, and now they’re apparently back to 6% (some apparently 7.5%). The formulas above presume using Regular Bleach with a 6% concentration. If you are using Regular Bleach with a higher concentration (e.g. 7.5%, 8.25%) applying the ratios above will simply result in a slightly more potent solution.

What is the difference between cleaning and disinfecting?

Cleaning removes dust and debris from a surface. Disinfecting kills a variety of germs including bacteria such as Staph, Salmonella and E. coli, the viruses such as influenza (the “flu” virus) and rhinovirus (one of the causes of the common cold) and the fungus that causes athlete’s foot. Disinfecting hard, nonporous surfaces is one of the most reliable ways to help lower the risk of spreading these germs from surfaces by touch.

Are disinfectants harmful to the environment?

No. During normal household use and disposal, bleach breaks down primarily into salt and water. Bleach does not contaminate ground water because it does not survive sewage treatment – neither in municipal sewage treatment plants nor in septic systems.

Why is bleach disinfectant so extremely important during a survival situation?

Without access to healthcare, an infection, if bad enough, can kill you. During a disaster or survival scenario, you are more vulnerable to cuts and injuries. These could become infected. Prior to the days of antibiotics and disinfection, many people commonly died from infection. Be sure to have an adequate supply of bleach in your supply of preparedness items, and remember that it has a shelf life of about 1 year.

Partial List of organisms that the proper Clorox bleach-to-water ratios can kill

Bacteria

Staphylococcus aureus (Staph.)
Salmonella choleraesuis
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Streptococcus pyogenes (Strep.)
Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli)
Shigella dysenteriae
Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

Fungi

Trichophyton mentagrophytes (can cause Athlete’s Foot)
Candida albicans (a yeast)

Viruses

Rhinovirus Type 37 (a type of virus that can cause colds)
Influenza A (Flu virus)
Hepatitis A virus
Rotavirus
Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)
HIV-1 (Human Immunodeficiency Virus)*
Herpes simplex Type 2
Rubella virus
Adenovirus Type 2
Cytomegalovirus
COVID-19 Coronavirus (see CDC source link above)

Sources:
– Oklahoma State University; Food & Agricultural Products Research & Technology Center
– University of California; UC Food Safety; PublicHealthOntario.ca
– Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
– Clorox

[ Read: How Much ‘ Pool Shock ‘ To Make Your Own Bleach Equivalent ]

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Thank you for the info KEN I believe this is updated ratio mixes. Thank you for the heads up of Clorox going back to 6% chlorine… v the old 8.25% I did notice that too so I instinctively doubled the quantity of bleach to be safe in my mixes…

Zombie apocalypses tip of the day: I am using those garden hand sprayers that hold 52 oz. with a small pressure pump on top… they are real handy and for like $8 you can pick them up at the lowes or HD sitting right next to the larger garden sprayers. You can make small batch mixes for everyday use…

All the best stay safe.

Hi…mine says the percentage is 7.5%. Should I just follow the measurements for the 6%?

Thanks in advance

Funny thing that bleach, dilute it and you get hypochlorous acid, an incredible oxidizer (carbon destroyer), mix it too strong and you get less hypochlorous and more hydrochloric acid (about 1,000 times less effective than hypochlorous acid).

Suggest, no more than, 1 cup bleach : 5 gallons of water (3/4 cup would probably be even better, give it a few minutes to work!)

Funny thing that bleach, too strong is damaging to equipment and not effective as a disinfectant!

In my former life in food packaging, we found that if we let our folks mix their own sanitizers they overdid the bleach. After a few years, they dissolved our sewers (HCl will do that)! Now we mix it carefully, hypochlorous acid is a weak acid and super sanitizer, real interesting chemistry!

I understnd that bleach “loses its potency” over an extended period of time, but I’ve never seen any exact data. Is it a straight line decline? If I buy a gallon of bleach and leave it without opening it will it keep its strength indefinitely?
What factors affect it, heat, light, cold, agitation, the seal on the lid?
I appreciate the work you did with the pool shock/bleach recently and I have some questions: What clorine test strips did you use and is there a difference in the various chlorine strips? What I’m wondering is if some test strips test to different parts per million of chlorine. Will a chlorine test for a swimming pool be good enough for testing ppm in drinking water, or is the test for swimming pools of a different magnitude? Do some tests measure parts per thousand or parts per billion? As you can tell, I’m ignorant about these chlorine tests and any help you or anyone on here can give would be greatly appreciated.

I heard that sunlight would cause degradation and that beach was sold in brown glass bottles prior to plastic. I bought an old brown glass jug at a yard sale and poured a gallon of beach into it. Put it in my pump shed and left it for a year. The shed is shaded and I doubt that the temperature ever got much over 70. After a a year I could no longer smell the beach odor.

The Clorox site gives this information regarding disinfectant solution for home use:

“Disinfecting Bleach Solution (½ cup Clorox® Regular Bleach added to 1 gallon water) The disinfecting solution has very specific instructions for mixing and use because Clorox® Regular Bleach is registered with the EPA as a disinfectant, with efficacy assured by following label instructions.”

“2 tablespoons Clorox® Regular Bleach diluted in 4 cups water) that you use up over several days for general countertop cleaning. However, when you are cleaning up after things that are highly likely to spread bacteria (like raw meat), you would want to use a freshly mixed solution.”

That is a 1:32 ratio solution regular Clorox bleach to water.

“So when you purchase a bottle of Clorox® Regular-Bleach₂ with CLOROMAX® at the grocery or Target, you are buying a solution of at least 6% sodium hypochlorite with a little sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate to help buffer the solution and help maintain the product performance for up to a year. Under normal usage, it will quickly break down to 95–98% salt and water, and any remaining bleach will quickly react with components in your sewer or septic tank line.”

The solutions you present do not represent those Clorox indicate will disinfect. Perhaps tablespoons confused with teaspoons?

Thank you for posting what CLOROMAX is as it is on many Clorox labels today and I was wondering what it is:

This means the sodium hypoclorite (bleach) has been mixed with some sodium hypochlrite (lye) and some sodium carbonate (washing soda – not baking soda) so I assume this has made their brand not useable to treat drinking water? And maybe other things. Anyone know?

We also have caliche/alkaline hard water where I live.
So another good tool to have around for testing water here is a TDS meter (total dissolved solids). About $10+ on Amazon. They also test electrical conductivity (pure water is not a good conductor of electricity) and water temperature- some also show PH. Good for checking Reverse Osmosis systems, beer brewing, pools, kombucha, aquariums, hydroponics, food processing…

Mr. Ken, thank you for giving us “practical” information instead of crackpot economic views, doom porn, and gibberish kook political viewpoints. So many of the “survival” sites seem to be written in Psych Wards . Again, good-solid stuff!

HI,

Can I make a solution and reuse it several times? How long will the solution be “good” to kill viruses?

Thanks

Thanks

Take a look at Steramine Quaternary Tablets.No expiration date.
Great disenfectent,but can not be used to purify water.

Thanks for the updated info Ken

Ken good details, Now for your next science project, how bout a cure for covid 19.Thanks much for all your research, you probably will prolong the health of more than a few of us.

I noticed this weekend that some of the Clorox scented types note NOT for use as antiseptic/antibacterial on the back label and they recommend using regular Clorox instead. People should beware and make sure to check their type before assuming sanitation is complete.

Yes, Regular Bleach. Thanks.

Better living through chemistry.

Neither bleach wipes nor bleach is available in stores in my area. I have never been real keen on strong chemicals to begin with. I use straight white vinegar (8 oz.) with 10-12 drops tea tree essential oil in a spray bottle. This is an excellent antibacterial and anti-fungal spray for all surfaces & kid-friendly. And you don’t have to wear a hazmat suit to use it!

Many people clean with vinegar. It’s cheap and natural. Cleaning recommendations are easy to find online, but Consumer Reports cautions: “There is no evidence that they are effective against coronavirus.”

Vinegar kills bacteria not viruses

Spray your surface down with white vinegar and followup immediately with a spray of household hydrogen peroxide from another bottle. This forms Peracetic acid which effectively kills the big guns in the bug world: e. coli, salmonella, listeria, staphylococcus aureus, shigella, candida mycoderma and many viruses, including the flu.

Hi JJ

And potentially you, too.

“Combining hydrogen peroxide and vinegar in the same container makes a corrosive – peracetic acid. This is potentially toxic and in high concentrations can damage the skin, eyes, throat, nose, and lungs.”

https://modernsurvivalblog.com/health/dont-mix-these-with-bleach/

What is the mixture of isopropyl alcohol and water to combat Coronavirus?

Look to CDC who has recipie for hand sanitizer, 3/4 Cup min 65% alcohol (some rated as high as 90%) and 1/4 Cup natural aloe Vera. Pharmacist added that they sometimes add a tea spoon of hydrogen peroxide.

Russ D ,
Alcohol should be minimum of 60 % according to our Hosts numbers. 3% peroxide also works.( regular pharma grade)
If you have essential oils… White vinegar 8 oz with 10 drops tea tree oil Is supposed to be adequate cleaner and sanitizer. ..According to one site on home made supplies. I added 10 drops each.. essential clove and lemongrass oil to mine. OVERKill? no way for me to test… shake hard before use… ALL are antiviral.

CDC recommends minimum of 60% alcohol by volume for disifecting. So 70% alcohol is sufficient if used without diilution. 91% alcohol is suitable for mixing to make hand sanitizers. 91% can be mixed with aloe vera at 2:1 to result in a final product with greater than 60%. If you were to substitute 70% alcohol, recommendations are for mixing between 7:1 and 9:1, so these are going to make a very watery product if mixed. 50% alcohol (commonly sold in $ stores) is not suitable for any type of disinfectant.

Thanks For the Information!

2020 has kicked my issues of general cootie into overdrive, and when it comes to disinfecting I tend to err on the side of “may cause fission”, so it’s good to have some solid numbers. I knew bleach did break down over time but had no idea you should mix a new batch daily. That goes into the “today I learned” vault. Also, damn it! I was going to get some sleep and then I stumble on this site! Well, I best get to reading…

Hi Ken
Thanks for this great information. is using Clorox Performance Bleach acceptable?

My Clorox Performance Bleach is 7.55%. It also has the word CONCENTRATED on the label. Purchased in a three-pack at Sam’s.

Are the scented bleaches as effective?

Georgian Browne
From what I have gathered the answer is NO.

The EPA ‘s list of approved disinfectants for fighting the coronavirus include: Cosa Oxonia Active from Ecolab Virasept from Ecolab Bleach Disinfectant Cleaner from Ecolab Oxycide Daily Disinfectant Cleaner from Ecolab Peroxide Multi Surface Cleaner and Disinfectant from Ecolab/Kay Chemical Co. Klercide 70/30 IPA from Ecolab Peroxide Disinfectant and Glass Cleaner RTU from Ecolab/Kay Chemical Co. SC-RTU Disinfectant Cleaner from Stepan Company Stepan Spray Disinfectant Concentrate from Stepan Company Detergent Disinfectant Pump Spray from Stepan Company Detergent Disinfectant Pump Spray from Stepan Company Condor 2 from W.M. Barr & Company Raptor 5 from W.M. Barr & Company Firebird F130 from Microban Products Company Formation HWS-256 from H&S Chemicals Division of Lonza Formulation HWS-128 from H&S Chemicals Division of Lonza HWS-64 from H&S Chemicals Division of Lonza Formulation HWS-32 from H&S Chemicals Division of Lonza Clorox Healthcare Bleach Germicidal Cleaner Spray from Clorox Professional Products Company Clorox Multi Surface Cleaner + Bleach from The Clorox Company Clorox Pet Solutions Advanced Formula Disinfecting Stain & Odor Remover from The Clorox Company Clorox Disinfecting Bleach2 from the The Clorox Company Clorox Disinfecting Bleach1 from The Clorox Company Clorox Germicidal Bleach3 from The Clorox Company Clorox Clean Up Cleaner + Bleach from The Clorox Company Clorox Disinfecting Bathroom Cleaner from The Clorox Company Clorox Disinfecting Wipes from The Clorox Company Clorox Toilet Bowl Cleaner With Bleach from The Clorox Company Sterilex Ultra Step from Sterilex Sterlilex Ultra Disinfectant Cleaner Solution 1 from Sterilex Lysol Brand Heavy Duty Cleaner and Disinfectant Concentrate from Reckitt Benckiser Clorox Healthcare Bleach Germicidal Wipes from Clorox Professional Products Company Clorox Commercial Solutions Toilet Bowl Cleaner with Bleach 1 from Clorox Professional Products Company Clorox Commercial Solutions Colorx Clean-up Disinfectant Cleaner with Bleach1 from Clorox Professional Products Company Clorox Commercial Solutions Clorox Disinfecting Spray from Clorox Professional Products Company Clorox Commercial Solutions Hydrogen Peroxide Cleaner Disinfectant from Clorox Professional Products Company Clorox Commercial Solutions Hydrogen Peroxide Cleaner Disinfectant Wipes from Clorox Professional Products Company Saginaw from Clorox Professional Products Company GNR from Clorox Professional Products Company Clorox Commercial Solutions Clorox Disinfecting Wipes from Clorox Professional Products Company CloroxPro Clorox Germicidal Bleach from Clorox Professional Products Company Clorox Commercial Solutions Clorox Disinfecting Biostain & Odor Remover from Clorox Professional Products Company Clorox Healthcare VersaSure Wipes from Clorox Professional Products Company Clorox Pro Clorox Total 360 Disinfecting Cleaner from Clorox Professional Products Company Lonza Formulations S-21F from Lonza Lonza Formulations DC-103 from Lonza Bardac 205M-10 from Lonza Bardac 205M-14.08 from Lonza Bardac 205M RTU from Lonza Bardac 205M-2.6 from Lonza Bardac 205M-23 from Lonza Lonza Disinfectant Wipes from Lonza Lonzagard RCS-256 Plus from Lonza Nugen MB5A-256 from Lonza Nugen MB5N-256 from Lonza Nugen MB5N-128 from Lonza Bardac 205M-7.5 from Lonza Lonza Formulation S-21 from Lonza Lonza Formulation S-18 from Lonza Lonza Formulation R-82 from Lonza Virex II/256 from Diversey Oxivir Tb from Diversey Oxy-Team Disinfectant Cleaner from Diversey Oxivir Wipes from Diversey Avert Sporicidal Disinfectant Cleaner from Diversey Oxivir 1 from Diversey Oxivir 1 Wipes from Diversey Klorsept from Medentech Ltd Klorkkleed… Read more »

BS…thank you. No doubt this will be of use to many.

Have a good day.

You’re welcome JF..

FYI Lots of these disinfectants contain detergents of some sort (and maybe perfumes and other chemicals too).

You need to pick the right product for the use you intend to make of it.

Personally, I use bleach tablets, they contain only the bleaching chemicals in tabletted powder form, are pre-measured, so I just add one or two to an old cleaned out thin bleach bottle, and add water.

I then dilute it for surface cleaning, disinfecting shop bought loose vegetables & fruit (its not just you who picked it up then put it back down) and even personal hygiene (good on wounds to stop them going septic until you can get something better), kills bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Don’t go overboard on its contact with skin (prolonged use causes acne, acquired allergy and tissue damage, so wear rubber gloves if you are cleaning with it). The meat & fish industry uses it in their processing wash water to keep bacteria levels down.

Have a good one Jane.

Ken – great information but I strongly suggest you change the lead asap. We just learned that Clorox Splash-less is useless. Scented is useless. They still call it “Bleach” but they obviously don’t think it’s an important enough detail to put it on the front of the bottle.

It’s appears to be a deliberate sin of omission on their part, one that is a major betrayal of the public trust. For 3 weeks I have been “protecting” my family with a utterly useless product.

Thanks

The online Clorox Safety Data Sheet I found for Splashless says: sodium hypochlorite composition “1 to 5%… the exact composition… is a trade secret”.
?

For the very long term try pool shock.Mix it with H2O and you have fresh
bleach.

Norm/Chuck,

I’m trying to make my own bleach here but all I could find was Pool Shock with a lower chlorine content.
Calcium Hypochlorite—56.44%
other Ingredients—–43.56&
total availability —–60 -100 ppm
ph —-7.2–7.8
calcium hardness—-above 200 ppm
available chlorine—-1-4 ppm

Can this Pool Shock be used, if so could you help me out with the formula?
I’m really lost here.
Thank You

Thank You so very much Ken, we’re old and with illness. You’ve been a much bigger help than you know!

Thank you for making the measure break down..stay safe.

Clorox zero splash bleach packets are designed to safely use bleach in a dish washer but I cannot find what that dilutes out to and am trying to figure out the packet to gallon ratio needed to equal a 1/2 cup bleach to 1 gallon of water needed for kennel disinfection as required for parvovirus disinfection. Any conversion factor? Clorox support does not know. Thanks in advance.

DR Fred,
I went searching for some kind of information. The only thing i could find was one packet to one gallon of water,,, for heavy laundry load could use 2 packages to one gallon of water…(laundry was the only application i found this in)
Given the severity of Parvo, i would use a minimum of 2, and would err on side of twice that..
. i would have the kennel empty spray it and let it sit..for an hour, then spray off with hot and plentiful water. dry . before letting critters back on that…hope this helps.

Dr FRED, I contacted a VET friend , with many years experience. recommendation – “I would not go any heavier than the 1/gallon and allow long contact time unless heavily soiled with organic matter, then use the 2. Stronger is not always better. Remember, chlorine is extremely corrosive to metal so use it, allow to set 30 min and RINSE well. Even then you may get some damage to metal surfaces.”

Funny thing that bleach, dilute it and you get hypochlorous acid, an incredible oxidizer (carbon destroyer), mix it too strong and you get less hypochlorous and more hydrochloric acid (about 1,000 times less effective than hypochlorous acid).

Suggest, no more than, 1 cup bleach : 5 gallons of water (3/4 cup would probably be even better, give it a few minutes to work!)

Funny thing that bleach, too strong is damaging to equipment and not effective as a disinfectant!

In my former life in food packaging, we found that if we let our folks mix their own sanitizers they overdid the bleach. After a few years, they dissolved our sewers (HCl will do that)! Now we mix it carefully, hypochlorous acid is a weak acid and super sanitizer, real interesting chemistry!

Thanks for giving a straightforward RATIO !
As in X units to Y of the same units.
Why do we persist in
“Five tablespoons to the gallon”
“Eight eydroppers to the teapot”
“20 Grandma’s tears to the hogtrough (that’s the small hogtrough of course, let’s not be ridiculous….)”

Now if only my spray bottle had 23 gradations on it….:)

Very good 👍👌👌

I have a question. I see a potential problem.

I have a 1-quart spray bottle of Clorox Clean-Up that I bought from a store. This is a very popular product that was widely available before the pandemic. The bottle says that it kills 99% of bacteria and viruses. The bottle says that it contains 1.84 percent concentration of Sodium Hypochlorite.

I have a gallon jug of bleach that I bought from an Aldi grocery store. The bottle says that it contains a 6 percent concentration of Sodium Hypochlorite.

So, if I want to make a cleaning product that is identical in bleach concentration to the 1-quart spray bottle of Clorox Clean-Up that I bought from a store, shouldn’t my goal be to dilute the 6 percent bleach down to a 1.84 percent concentration?

My calculations tell me that if I take 290 ml of this bleach (6 percent solution), (i.e., approximately 1 cup of bleach, and dilute it with water to make 946 ml (i.e., 4 cups or 1 quart) of final solution, I will then have a 1.84 percent solution.

But this is a much higher concentration of Sodium Hypochlorite that the CDC recommended formula of 4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water.

This is also a much higher concentration of bleach than is recommended by this blog [for non-food surfaces: 2-3/4 Tablespoons Clorox® Regular-Bleach / Quart (4 cups) water; for food contact surfaces: 3/4 teaspoon Clorox® Regular-Bleach / Quart (4 cups) water].

So, this leaves my wondering why the CDC and this blogger recommend a concentration of bleach that is so much lower than the concentration found in the most popular bleach-based household cleaning spray, Clorox Clean-Up.

Am I missing something? Have I made a mistake in my calculations? Any comments would be much appreciated. Thank you.

Thank you. I will look forward to, and appreciate, any comments and/or analysis of the fact that Clorox Clean-Up spray cleaning solution, the most popular bleach-based general-purpose household cleaning spray in America, contains a 1.84 percent concentration of Sodium Hypochlorite.

The exact Clorox product I have is “Clorox Clean-Up, All Purpose Cleaner with Bleach.” The exact bottle I have can be seen on the Wal-Mart website. To see this product on the Wal-Mart website, type 550296217 into the search box on the Wal-Mart website (I can’t give the exact link in this comment, because I think such links are not allowed in comments.)

If you scroll down on this product’s page on the website, it says this:

“Ingredients: Sodium Hypochlorite 1.84%.”

The same statement appears on the bottle’s label. You can zoom in on the image of the bottle on the Wal-Mart website and see that statement on the front of the bottle, in the lower right-hand corner.

All this leads me to wonder: Is the Clorox company making a mistake in selling an all-purpose home cleaner that has Sodium Hypochlorite at a 1.84 percent concentration? Is that likely? On the other hand, is the CDC making a mistake in recommending, for use, as a household disinfectant to kill the Coronavirus, a dilution of bleach that has a much lower concentration of Sodium Hypochlorite? I’m really befuddled. I’ve already spent hours online researching this, and I’m getting tired of finding no clear answer. I find it hard to believe that the scientists and lawyers who work for the Clorox company would allow a household product to be sold that would be dangerous or harmful for Americans to use. On the other hand, the scientists at the CDC are usually right about things–but I suppose they aren’t infallible. I have used this Clorox Clean-Up product for years now, but have not been able to find it available for sale since the pandemic began a few months ago. So, I’ve decided to make my own Coronavirus-killing disinfecting spray by diluting bleach with water. But what should the Sodium Hypochlorite concentration be of my homemade mix? That’s the question! Should I follow the example of the Clorox Clean-Up product? Or should I follow the advice of the CDC and virtually everyone else who is giving out advice on this? Well, any further comments or perspectives on all this would be appreciated. Thank you.

If I have Clorox 7.5% sodium hypochlorite and I want to dilute it with water to make it 6% sodium hypochlorite, how much water should do I need to add?

Thank you for mentioning that, I just pulled out a bottle of lavender Clorox, will use regular now.
🙋🏻🐶🐾🐾

Jeff, I believe you add a fourth of the total amount. For instance, if you are using one cup of the Clorox, add another fourth of water.

I got that by thinking of it as 92.5% plain water. Say you’ve got a liter (1000 mL) of it. 925 ML would be water, and 75 would be bleach. If you add a fourth of the total amount (250 ML) of water, you now have a total of 1,250 mL. Only 75 of the mL are bleach, and 75 divided by 1,250 is .06, or 6%.

If I’m off on my math, someone please correct me.

We use Pure Bright Germicidal Ultra Bleach.
The directions say to use 3/4 cup of bleach per gallon of water.

We are needing to use spray bottles.
how much water/bleach do you put in the below
16 oz bottle
24 oz bottle
32 oz bottle