state-income-tax-rates-36K-2010
MONEY

State Income Tax Comparison

State Income Tax Table

2010 Individual Tax Rates (percentage)
Rounded to the nearest tenth
Not including whatever state deductions that may exist

Although New Hampshire and Tennessee are listed as zero income tax, they do tax on interest and dividend income at 5% and 6% respectively.

Three income levels were chosen. A lower-than-average income, a probable somewhat average income, and a higher than average income, so as to show any variance in tax rates that may exist at those levels.

State 2010 rates
$36,000
2010 rates
$51,000
2010 rates
$87,000
Alaska 0 0 0
Florida 0 0 0
Nevada 0 0 0
New Hampshire 0 0 0
South Dakota 0 0 0
Tennessee 0 0 0
Texas 0 0 0
Washington 0 0 0
Wyoming 0 0 0
Illinois 3 3 3
Pennsylvania 3.1 3.1 3.1
Arizona 3.4 4.2 4.2
Indiana 3.4 3.4 3.4
North Dakota 3.4 3.4 3.8
New Jersey 3.5 5.3 6.4
Ohio 3.5 4.1 4.7
Louisiana 4 6 6
Michigan 4.4 4.4 4.4
West Virginia 4.5 6 6.5
Colorado 4.6 4.6 4.6
Maryland 4.8 4.8 4.8
New Mexico 4.9 4.9 4.9
Alabama 5 5 5
Connecticut 5 5 5
Mississippi 5 5 5
Utah 5 5 5
Massachusetts 5.3 5.3 5.3
Oklahoma 5.5 5.5 5.5
Delaware 5.6 5.6 7
Kentucky 5.8 5.8 6
Virginia 5.8 5.8 5.8
D.C. 6 8.5 8.5
Georgia 6 6 6
Missouri 6 6 6
California 6.3 9.6 9.6
Kansas 6.5 6.5 6.5
Maine 6.5 6.5 6.5
Wisconsin 6.5 6.5 6.5
Iowa 6.8 7.9 9
Nebraska 6.8 6.8 6.8
Montana 6.9 6.9 6.9
New York 6.9 6.9 6.9
Arkansas 7 7 7
North Carolina 7 7 7.8
Rhode Island 7 7 7.8
South Carolina 7 7 7
Vermont 7 7 8.3
Minnesota 7.1 7.1 7.9
Hawaii 7.6 8.3 8.3
Idaho 7.8 7.8 7.8
Oregon 9 9 9



A quick look at state income tax in a bar-graph format provides a good visual reference where your state tax ranks with all other states.

Sate Income Tax Rate (percent)

($36,000 annual income)
state-income-tax-rates-36K-2010

Sate Income Tax (percent)

($51,000 annual income)
state-income-tax-rates-51K-2010

Sate Income Tax (percent)

($87,000 annual income)
state-income-tax-rates-87K-2010

Not only is the tax data and state comparison interesting to look at, but if you are ever considering a move to another state, this information should be of some help. This is intended only to be a guide and general view of where the various states rank.



If you enjoyed this, or topics of survival preparedness or current events risk awareness,
check out our current homepage articles…

Similar Posts

6 Comments

  1. Potentially naive question here, but here goes anyway. In the UK, we pay income tax of around 20% (it is banded according to earnings, but that is the basic rate) and National Insurance of 11% – They are both deduced from wages. We also pay VAT of 20%. I’ll not even mention the tax on petrol, because it is too high to even think about.

    So… how on earth are taxes in America so low?

    1. The more socialist a country, the more taxes the working class must pay to support its programs, IMO.
      In the US, basically, we pay a federal tax, a state tax, sales tax, property tax, sometimes a city tax, gasoline tax, and of course all of the ‘built-in’ taxes of the products that we buy.

      The tax rates vary according to income and deductions, but the federal tax may average around 20% for many, the state tax average is probably somewhere around 6%, state sales tax probably averages around 7%, annual property tax is often around 1 to 1.5% the value of your home, gasoline tax is probably around a third of the price of gas, there are annual taxes on your vehicles, there are countless ‘invisible’ built-in taxes on products and services, the health insurance combination of what employers pay combined with employee contribution probably averages somewhere between $5,000 and $15,000 per year per person depending on age and policy type, the social security tax I believe is in the neighborhood of 10%.

      So, I would say on average, a typical employee of medium earnings ‘loses’ about 36% of what otherwise would be ‘untaxed wages’, then ends up paying more taxes on product purchases, property tax, and all sorts of other taxes with the money that is left over.

      I do believe though that countries like the UK have it worse, due to the need for revenue to fund all programs. I’ve been to the UK a few times, and I know how much you all pay for gasoline and other items! Don’t worry though, I have a feeling that the US is trying to catch up…

    2. These tables are just state income tax, not federal. But wait, there’s more!

      More taxes: Social Security (this is income stolen from us, most will never see a dime, employers also match dollar for dollar), property tax (we really just rent our land from the government), automobile tax, sales tax (no VAT…yet), capital gains tax on investments (punitive). I could go on and on, but basically we are taxed on every dollar earned, and again when it’s spent.

      And then there’s inflation, which is a hidden tax. Our FED (central bank), has been printing money for years, and are about to start again. This is currency debasement, and makes everything go up in price (except income)…higher price to tax.

      Inflation is also our greatest export.

      It’s not so low as these tables indicate. It’s very much higher.

    3. We are not a socialist nation with socialized mandatory medicine though our current leader is pulling us down that road.

  2. Thanks for your responses! I was ready to pack up and move to Florida, but it looks like you pay the same, just in different ways. And I’m not too keen on Alligators, anyway.

  3. Gasoline tax is probably around a third of the price of gas, there are annual taxes on your vehicles, there are countless ‘invisible’ built-in taxes on products and services, the health insurance combination of what employers pay combined with employee contribution probably averages somewhere between $5,000 and $15,000 per year per person depending on age and policy type, the social security tax I believe is in the neighborhood of 10%.