You probably spend about 38 percent of your life at work, along with the typical commute. Assuming that you’re not retired.

You spend 29 percent of your time sleeping, if you sleep 7 hours a night.

33 percent of your time you’re doing other things, at home, etc..

 So, if a SHTF event were to occur, there might be a ~38% chance that you will be at work.

For preparedness sake, this is a significant statistic. Here’s what I mean…

Preparedness For If The Balloon Goes Up While At Work

 Don’t ignore preparedness while at your work place. You might be at work if and when “it” happens.

One of the most effective ways that you can prep for this is by having adequate kit/supplies in your vehicle (assuming that you drive to work). Your vehicle will be able to hold a significant or at least adequate amount of supplies and gear of your choosing.

If you don’t commute by way of your own vehicle, it will be even more important to supply yourself at the workplace and your every-day-carry.

As is the case for most tangible preparedness choices, you’re looking at the basics first. Like water and food. You’re at work. So there’s technically shelter. Maybe the power is out. Perhaps a flashlight. It’s part of my EDC on my keychain (I use this one).

However your mission will be to get home (typically). So that means a bag (to carry your supplies which will help you get there if you have to hoof it). If your vehicle is operational and the roads are passable, great. You will probably have little problem, at least if you ‘get out of dodge’ quickly enough.

However, I haven’t defined the SHTF event. And I’m not going to. But I do hope that you will at least think about it. The “what if”. Define it yourself for different circumstances. Let that guide you as to what you might find tangibly helpful.

A Few Thoughts On Supplies For This Scenario

Walking shoes or hiking boots. Comfortable appropriate footwear in case you have to walk a great distance. That’s easy to keep in your vehicle somewhere.

Here’s a bonus… got a bicycle or folding bike? Though certainly a challenge to keep with you. Maybe it’ll work for you. Just saying.

Are you always wearing appropriate seasonal outerwear when you go to work during the winter? People go from their heated homes to their heated cars to their heated workplace. The right gear might be overlooked…

Got a desk at work? Or a personal space, a locker, other? Why not use one of the drawers for emergency supplies. Like a bunch of CLIF Bars for quick food, for example.

The CLIF Bar Might Be The Best Energy Food Bar For Survival Kit

Keep several water bottles in there too. Is there a First Aid Kit there at work? Workplace buildings can get real dark if the power goes out. I consider a flashlight a must have too.

A change of clothes might be good – depending on your normal work attire.

From time to time I go through my truck and adjust what I keep in there for preparedness. You should too! Think about it in the context of being at work. Maybe you’ll need to hunker down there for awhile (as opposed to immediately hoofing it back home). Maybe that will cause you to adjust your supplies.

Re-evaluate what you have and make adjustments accordingly.

While those of you who are preparedness-minded probably have a decent supply of various preps at home, the point here is not to neglect your workplace. Especially since you spend so much time there.

What else?

Continue reading: Survival Gear For Preparedness | What You Need And Why