flour-mill-nutrimill-grain-mill

Nutrimill Electric Grain Mill To Make Flour For Homemade Bread

A grain mill /flour mill is used to grind (mill) your own flour from wheat (wheat berries). We have both a hand grain mill and an electric grain mill (Nutrimill). Yes, the electric one sure is easier :=)

By using an electric flour mill you will be able to make your own homemade bread and baked goods, likely resulting in a healthier (and tastier) end-product. Especially since you control the ingredients.

You might say that there are basically two types of flour mills…
Electric powered (plug it in) and Manual powered (crank it).

Here’s why an electric flour mill is a good thing to have:
 
We have both types of grain mills (electric and hand-crank). However as you might expect – the electric powered mill is LOTS and LOTS easier and faster.

For ultimate ‘preparedness’ however, the manual (hand-crank-powered) grain /flour mill will obviously function without electricity. For day-to-day ‘modern’ living though, the electric flour mill sure is a ‘nice to have’…

The best of both worlds is to have one of each.

Here’s one advantage of having an electric grain mill… They’re so easy to use. And therefore you will likely actually use it, and learn how to work with your own milled flour – making homemade bread!

There’s a wide variety of prices and quality (as with most things). My recommendation is to buy what you can afford based on your own budget. Generally the cheaper products are usually, well, ‘cheap’. The more expensive products are ‘usually’ ‘better’. You get what you pay for.

Nutrimill Electric Grain Mill

We happen to have the Nutrimill Classic Electric Grain Mill. Now many years later, we’re still very happy with the purchase, and it gets used a-lot.

Nutrimill Classic
(view on amzn)

The typical flour mill contains two hard abrasive surfaces that face each other – which spin at high speed separated by a very tiny (adjustable) distance, and grinds grain to a powder (flour).

With our flour mill, 1 cup of wheat berries will grind (mill) into just about 2 cups of flour. We use about 2 cups of wheat berries (approx. 3.5 cups of flour) while making bread.

We keep ‘Wheat Berries’ at home in bulk storage. I’ve purchased them in 50 pound bags as well as ready-made 5 gallon buckets.

Hard White Wheat Berries
(amzn)

Most whole grains, when stored properly (cool and dry), will last for decades. They do not begin to spoil or lose nutritional value until the grain is cracked or milled. This is why we only mill what we need immediately before baking – for optimum freshness.

Making fresh homemade bread with freshly milled flour…tastes delicious. And it’s healthier than most store-bought breads (because you control what goes into the recipe). Making your own homemade bread also enables a feeling of self-sufficiency.

The sky is the limit with regards to the bread recipes that you might use, or what you decide to throw into the bread – enabling all sorts of flavors and textures.

hard-red-winter-wheat-berries
flour-mill-milled-red-wheat-flour

If you haven’t taken the plunge yet, consider getting yourself a grain /flour mill and start making your own homemade breads (and other baked goods) from your own freshly milled flour.

[ Read: Choosing A Hand Grain Mill ]

8 Comments

  1. I bought a bag of wheat berries from Amazon, went to use them and it was filled with weevils!

    1. I bought a 25-lb bag of hard white wheat berries from Amazon and put them in the freezer for several days. I got them out to get to room temperature, had an accident 2 weeks ago that caused me to leave them in the pantry. I just checked them and there are no weevils. If you take a while to vacuum seal them, you would expect weevils. If you open them as soon as you buy them, you should not expect weevils! Freezing the wheat berries kills the weevil eggs. Then vacuum sealing in smaller bags helps to keep it fresh until needed.

    2. This is one good reason to put every dry food in your pantry thru the freezer as soon as they come into your home. if there is one weevil in any shelf food they will invade everything unless you protect by freezing and sealing.. every dry mix, flour, cake mix, pasta, grain.

  2. i have a good grain mill but it is manual with a pulley option for an electric motor like my meat grinder.
    i like the option of not being grid dependent. i don’t like to depend on others whims.
    it could all go to hell in nanoseconds. nothing wrong with stuff like this, but be prepared with options and not dependent on others. i have one from Country Living, no it was not cheap, think i gave about five hundred for it, but it works great and will likely last longer than me. i can pass it down to the nieces with the all american cooker and many other things.
    buy once, cry once.

  3. i have a plywood table 2×2.5 ft with 2×4’s across the bottom with old carpet glued to the bottom of them to not scratch the kitchen table, with a i/3 HP electric motor mounted to it. slot’s cut in so that i can mount my flower grinder and meat grinder to it with bolts, wing nuts and use the same belt. a piggybacked foot pedal switch to turn it on and off.
    take this for what it’s worth, but it works well for us.

  4. Perfect topic today. I have this mill and I love it and use it. Also, if you are storing and using any type of grains I HIGHLY recommend this book: “The Essential Home-Ground Flour Book” by Sue Becker. (“Learn Complete Milling and Baking Techniques”). AND…if you are gluten-free, or dairy-free keep reading this! This author goes into details about how healthy many, many grains are for us, and then includes 100 recipes using fresh-ground flours. Now, she also includes substitutions for making the recipes grain-free or dairy-free or both! Includes the substitutions (right on the side of the recipe) and how much to use, which substitute milks (like nut milks or rice milks) are best to substitute. Covers sweeteners, like agave, honey, molasses, etc. to use, and so much more. Breads, muffins, pizza doughs. From grits to pastas to desserts and more. Amazing book! If you are using and storing grains, really get this book.

    1. Correction: I meant to state that she makes the recipes GLUTEN-FREE or dairy free…not grain-free. Sheesh.

  5. I also endorse the Nutrimill as I have been using this unit for years. It does a beautiful job of grinding my grains. I use Prairie Gold or Golden 86 hard white wheat more than any other…even to make brownies and coffee cakes. I do not sift. For more delicate needs, I use soft white wheat and there are times I even sift that… But not too often because I want all the goodness from the kernel. I have had a wonder Mill Junior for many, many years as a back up. In fact, I used this exclusively for the first year that I was grinding grain but my husband bought me the Nutrimill as a gift to save me time. It was purchased along with a Bosche mixer that could handle the dough mixing.

    Last year, I was gifted the Country Living hand operated mill with the bean and corn auger. It took forever for some parts to come in so I only just now am able to try out this beauty. I am just getting clearance to do some types of chores so I will try this unit out shortly. I am thrilled to have the easier to use manual CL grain mill and will find a new home for the excellent Wondermill Jr.

    I use these mills regularly, mostly the Nutrimill, and bake bread from wheat I have ground regularly. It is amazing flavor! But it has no preservatives so need to eat each loaf in three days. Our friends also love the flavor and health benefits of these breads. When I eat store-bought bread I would get sick to my stomach… I do not have a problem with my ground kernel bread and I think it’s because there are no preservatives and other junk added to the bread.

    We also roll our own oat groats (kernels without the husk). Again, amazing flavor and benefits. We use a different unit for this task.

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