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Cherry Tomatoes A Survival Garden Treat

September 8, 2010, by Ken Jorgustin

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bowl-full-of-cherry-tomatoes


OK, so Cherry Tomatoes don’t have lots of survival calories with about 3 calories each, but they taste so good (and they do contain healthy amounts of vitamin A, C, and Potassium as well as antioxidant properties from lycopene).

Cherry Tomatoes are very easy to grow, and will provide an excellent additive to foods and salads made from other vegetables in your survival garden. A great aspect of growing tomatoes is the fact that they will keep on producing for you all through the season. It doesn’t take many tomato plants to supply an enormous amount of produce.

This year I planted two varieties of certified organic cherry tomatoes, Fox Cherry and Chadwick Cherry. They both have grown very well in a few spots around the yard and are producing tremendously. The Fox Cherry tomato plant and its fruit grew a bit smaller in size than the Chadwick (which is purposely over-sized), and both varieties taste great.


chadwick-cherry-tomato-plant


There is nothing like eating fresh home grown tomatoes. Many of the tomatoes that you buy in the grocery store are genetically tailored to be picked early, before they are fully ripe, so that they last longer from harvest to the store shelves. I believe that this method sacrifices some taste and is often no comparison to the flavor of home grown.

Since growing tomatoes is really so easy, I suggest it to anyone who is starting a garden of their own. There isn’t time left this year in most parts of the northern hemisphere to start a tomato patch before the colder weather sets in (they take 80 to 90 days to maturity), but do consider starting some during late winter – in time for Spring planting.


chadwick-cherry-tomatoes-on-vine


If your harvest provides more than you can eat, you can choose to preserve them or give them away (maybe trade foods with your neighbor growing a survival garden). To preserve tomatoes, there is canning (bottling or tinning), sauce, salsa, ketchup (catsup?), dried, or frozen.


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