dmt-diamond-double-sided-diafold-knife-sharpener
SURVIVAL KITCHEN

Every Kitchen Needs A Knife Sharpener

dmt-diamond-double-sided-diafold-knife-sharpener

You don’t need to own a $500 set of kitchen knives, but you do need to own a knife sharpener because having very sharp kitchen knives makes a tremendous difference while preparing foods.

There are lots and lots of knife sharpening tools and most all of them will get the job done.

A good knife sharpener though does not necessarily have to be expensive.


 
Not too long ago I purchased a knife sharpener for a fairly inexpensive price, and it turned out to be quite a surprise… it worked amazingly well, and it was very easy to use.
The DMT Double Sided Diamond Diafold

 

DMT Diafold Sharpener

The way it works is simple.

This particular sharpener has two surfaces, both impregnated with diamond particles, one course surface and one fine surface.

 
dmt-sharpener-diamond-impregnated

 

How To Sharpen

Simply look at the knife blade edge and pay particular attention to the angle of the blade where it steepens to a sharp pointed edge. That angle is usually about 20 degrees, depending – this is the angle at which you should sharpen against the sharpener’s surface.

A rule-of-thumb is hold the knife at a 90-degree angle to the sharpener surface, then halve the angle (45-degrees) and then halve it again (apprx. 20-degrees). This should be a good sharpening angle.

More expensive sharpening systems have methods to physically hold the blade and/or sharpener at a fixed angle or adjustable angle. However, the basic method of “eyeballing” it will work quite surprisingly well and get you very good results without becoming overly elaborate with the process.

Always slide the blade across the sharpening surface in the direction that you would be cutting something. In other words, do not pull the blade across the surface, but instead push it forward across the sharpener surface.

There is no need to apply much pressure, just lightly push across.

Try to sweep the entire blade’s surface in one motion as you complete each sharpening motion.

Then flip the knife over and sharpen the other side the same way.

I typically start with the course surface side of the DMT sharpener and work it a few times, then switch to the fine side.

 
dmt-diamond-knife-sharpener

 
This will work with just about any knife, cutters, or even heavy-duty tools like an axe, chisel, etc.. It’s a great tool to keep around.

This particular knife sharpener is made by a company named Diamond Machining Technology, DMT, and is manufactured in the USA. It looks like they make several models, but this one, the Diamond DiaFold, I found to be affordable, very effective and simple, and it folds up into a neat little package. The surface is long enough to get a good knife stroke, while small enough to throw in a kit or bag (or pocket).

Like I said, there are lots of good knife sharpeners out there, but give this one a look and consider getting one for yourself. You will be slicing through your kitchen foods with ease!

The DMT Double Sided Diamond Diafold

Similar Posts

Get notified when new comments are posted
Notify of
CHOOSE AN ALIAS NAME
Affirm you're human... not a Bot


[ Read: COMMENT POLICY ]
[ Visit: Open-Forum for Off-Topic-conversation ]
5 Comments
Sort by Oldest First
Sort by Newest First Sort by Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

I use a notch type sharpener. It has a notch for coarse and fine. Use the coarse notch to get the ‘set’ (angle) correct then the fine notch to sharpen. You can use the fine notch to sharpen serrated edges. Came with the knives.

Better knives will stay sharper longer. It’s pretty easy to get fine cutlery online for half MSRP.

Ladies–I have a knife like the one pictured. Use an upside down ceramic coffee cup to sharpen your knives.
Works great.

good info. thanks

The diamond faced hones are definitely outstanding, but PLEASE…..spend the money to purchase a top of the line hone, because I promise you that the cheap ones will wear out in very short order. Stainless steel will tear them up the fastest. I went through a couple of them before I got wise. I go to a place called Travis Hardware, an old school hardware store to replace the last one and the guy gave me the facts. He showed me the cheap one, then said if I was going to sharpen things often that he had a hone that would be the last one I’d ever buy. It cost me eighty bucks for a set of three smallish diamond hones, but they outperform the old one[s] by an order of magnitude.

JM2C

Hey kudos on your website and great tips. Your knife sharpening tips are awesome, keep it up.